US Patent No. 9,046,085 B2, Miniature Pumps
Summary- this is a new patent issued by the US patent technology office (USPTO) on June 2, 2015. The patent covers our novel invention of a medical-grade for smart bandage and standalone applications. It features a hydrogel polymer muscle to dispense wound healing agents(i.e. antiseptics, antibotics, growth factors) or sealants without any electrical power. It is a low-cost product offering via 3D printing fabrication with capability to dispense microliters to milliliters per hour. It has been developed under the National Institutes of Health(NIH) grant no. 5R44RR025266-01, the Self-Sealing Therapy Ostomy Pouch.
self-powered “polymer muscleactivated”
medical-grade pump is a new advance in woundcare
treatment and drug delivery. PolyMed is a completely new innovation
in chemotherapeutic delivery to promote wound healing. Polymed is
the first ultraportable infusion pump worldwide to offer performance,
safety, disposability, comfort and flexibility without any electrical
power. Eden Medical has developed and bench-tested a disposable
muscle-activated pump prototype under the Phase 1 National Institutes
of Health (NIH) Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant no.
1R43RR025266-01.

Latest Conference Paper
Applications of Angiosome Classification Model for Monitoring Disease Progression in Diabetic Feet
Manish Bharara, Jeffrey Schoess, et.al
2014 Summer Simulation Multi-Conference(SummerSim '14), Society for Modeling and Simulation, July 6 2014, Monterey, Ca.  

Abstract- Every 20 seconds there is a diabetes related amputation somewhere in the world. Diabetes affects 282 million people in the world today and by 2035 , at least 592 million people will have diabetes- approximately 10% of the world's population. This paper presents a conceptual methodology for classification of thermograms based on the angiosomes of the feet. 


“Every 20 seconds there is a diabetes related amputation
somewhere in the world”. Diabetes affects 382 million
people in the world today and by 2035, at least 592 million
people will have diabetes- approximately 10% of the world's
adult population. One of the most sinister complications of
diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, where patients loose the
gift of pain in their feet. Presently, clinicians assess
circulation, neuropathy, and plantar pressures to identify the
risk of foot ulceration that when get infected lead to
amputations. The key common factor that appears to be
present both in dysfunctional healing and in predicting
breakdown may be inflammation. Inflammation is a central
unifying concept of medicine spanning across the spectrum
of pathologies from a simple bruise to cancer. For a diabetic
wound, uncontrolled inflammation produces staggering
impact for the patients as well as the healthcare system.
Currently, there are no objective means of measuring wound
inflammation and surprisingly the status quo is
‘measurements of temperatures using back of the hand’.
This paper presents a conceptual methodology for
classification of thermograms based on the angiosomes of
the feet.
“Every 20 seconds there is a diabetes related amputation
somewhere in the world”. Diabetes affects 382 million
people in the world today and by 2035, at least 592 million
people will have diabetes- approximately 10% of the world's
adult population. One of the most sinister complications of
diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, where patients loose the
gift of pain in their feet. Presently, clinicians assess
circulation, neuropathy, and plantar pressures to identify the
risk of foot ulceration that when get infected lead to
amputations. The key common factor that appears to be
present both in dysfunctional healing and in predicting
breakdown may be inflammation. Inflammation is a central
unifying concept of medicine spanning across the spectrum
of pathologies from a simple bruise to cancer. For a diabetic
wound, uncontrolled inflammation produces staggering
impact for the patients as well as the healthcare system.
Currently, there are no objective means of measuring wound
inflammation and surprisingly the status quo is
‘measurements of temperatures using back of the hand’.
This paper presents a conceptual methodology for
classification of thermograms based on the angiosomes of
the feet.
“Every 20 seconds there is a diabetes related amputation
somewhere in the world”. Diabetes affects 382 million
people in the world today and by 2035, at least 592 million
people will have diabetes- approximately 10% of the world's
adult population. One of the most sinister complications of
diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, where patients loose the
gift of pain in their feet. Presently, clinicians assess
circulation, neuropathy, and plantar pressures to identify the
risk of foot ulceration that when get infected lead to
amputations. The key common factor that appears to be
present both in dysfunctional healing and in predicting
breakdown may be inflammation. Inflammation is a central
unifying concept of medicine spanning across the spectrum
of pathologies from a simple bruise to cancer. For a diabetic
wound, uncontrolled inflammation produces staggering
impact for the patients as well as the healthcare system.
Currently, there are no objective means of measuring wound
inflammation and surprisingly the status quo is
‘measurements of temperatures using back of the hand’.
This paper presents a conceptual methodology for
classification of thermograms based on the angiosomes of
the feet.
“Every 20 seconds there is a diabetes related amputation
somewhere in the world”. Diabetes affects 382 million
people in the world today and by 2035, at least 592 million
people will have diabetes- approximately 10% of the world's
adult population. One of the most sinister complications of
diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, where patients loose the
gift of pain in their feet. Presently, clinicians assess
circulation, neuropathy, and plantar pressures to identify the
risk of foot ulceration that when get infected lead to
amputations. The key common factor that appears to be
present both in dysfunctional healing and in predicting
breakdown may be inflammation. Inflammation is a central
unifying concept of medicine spanning across the spectrum
of pathologies from a simple bruise to cancer. For a diabetic
wound, uncontrolled inflammation produces staggering
impact for the patients as well as the healthcare system.
Currently, there are no objective means of measuring wound
inflammation and surprisingly the status quo is
‘measurements of temperatures using back of the hand’.
This paper presents a conceptual methodology for
classification of thermograms based on the angiosomes of
the feet
Latest Journal Paper

Rapid deswelling of poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels in

response to temperature changes

SIVAPRAKASAM K, MAWILMADA P, SCHOESS JN, SCHAEFER L, LEE Y.H, RAMAKRISHNAN L and MANDELL M


World Research Journal of Biomaterials
ISSN: 2278-7046 & E-ISSN: 2278-7054, Volume 1, Issue 1, 2012


Abstract- Thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPA) hydrogel has been synthesized and characterized to assess rapid deswelling kinetics for medical device development. Eighteen different (18) formulations were investigated using monomers N-isopropyl acrylamide and acrylic acid (i.e. N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) with N,N’-dimethylenebisacrylamide (BIS) as a cross-linking agent. The volume-temperature behavior of the PNIPA was characterized by mass determination and surface morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The deswelling rate of the hydrogels at different temperatures and time were measured. For example, the hydrogel synthesized with N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-acrylic acid lost 70% of it’s mass within 10 minutes over a temperature range of 25 to 42°C. See copy of journal publication below(click on pdf file icon).

Document
Latest Imaging Journal Paper
Coming events cast their shadows before: detecting inflammation in the acute diabetic foot and the foot in remission
Bharara M, Schoess J, Armstrong DG

DIABETES/METABOLISM RESEARCH AND REVIEWS
Diabetes Metab Res Rev 2012
, Vol 28

Abstract- The incidence of diabetic foot complications, most notably wounds, is increasing worldwide. Most people who present for care of a foot wound will become infected. Globally, this results in one major amputation every 30 s with over 2500 limbs lost per day. Presently, clinicians assess circulation, neuropathy and plantar pressures to identify the risk of foot ulceration. Several studies have suggested prevention of foot ulcers by identifying individuals at high risk and treating for lower extremity complications. Our group has proposed several
diagnostics as well as prevention strategies, especially thermography and thermometry for management of patients with diabetic foot complications. These strategies employ non-invasive assessment of inflammation for acute as well as chronic care for the foot, with the intent to prevent ulceration/re-ulceration and subsequent traumatic amputations. The authors’ review some important clinical studies and ongoing research in this area, with the long-term goal to further the role of thermography and thermometry in clinical care for the diabetic foot. See copy of journal publication below(click on pdf file icon).
Document

Imaging Journal Paper


Wound Inflammatory Index: A Proof of Concept Study to Assess Wound Healing Trajectory

Bharara B, Schoess J, Nouvong A, Armstrong DG

Journal of Diabetic Science and Technology, Volume 4, Issue 4, July 2010

Abstract- Diabetes around the globe results in one major limb amputation every 30 seconds, over 2500 limbs lost per day. The underlying patholphysiology sometimes leads to a chronic inflammatory stage, which may prevent appropriate healing, and therefore, the need for a clear strategy for assessing and classifying wounds and wound healing cannot be overstated. Temperature is a surrogate marker for inflammation. Quantitative thermography using a numerical index provides a useful way to assess wound healing. Advances in technology have afforded the availability of low cost, high-resolution thermal imaging systems, which can be used to quantify sensitive changes on the skin surface and may be particularly useful to develop monitoring strategies for wounds. This manuscript provides a standardized technique for calculating a thermal index supported with a case report from assessment of a diabetic foot ulcer. In this single case study, the thermal index/wound inflammatory index indicates a shift from negative to positive (p<0.05), before it reaches zero. See copy of journal publication below(click on pdf file icon).

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